Broken Pencil

Canzine 2009

Nov 1

Canada's Largest Zine Fair and Festival of Alternative Culture returns, and Coach House will have a table, offering some of our latest and greatest books.

We'll also be part of the day's events, as senior editor Alana Wilcox will be one of the The One-Two Punch Book Pitch judges (starting at 2 p.m.), and publicist Evan Munday will be participating in the Canzine Olympics (starting at 3).

See all the details and event information at www.brokenpencil.com.

Location: 
The Gladstone Hotel
1214 Queen Street West
Toronto, ON
Canada

Mike Blouin profiled by Broken Pencil

Mike Blouin, author of the novel Chase and Haven, was recently interviewed by Spencer Gordon of Broken Pencil. You can read the full interview online here, but we've put a taste below:

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Broken Pencil carried away by Saudade

Saudade: The Possibilities of Place by Anik See
By Andrea Nene
Broken Pencil
February 4 2009

Saudade: The Possibilities of Place is a collection of fascinating stories of Anik See's travels across the world. Her style, a stream of consciousness writing, has amazing anecdotes and a wisdom that I have never read before. Through Anik, I can travel vicariously to the places she has travelled like Yellowknife, Cuba, and Amsterdam, and gain the wisdom she attained along her travels. Anik's stories are wonderful and her thoughts are refreshing.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Broken Pencil on Jeramy Dodds and Glenn Gould

Crabwise to the Hounds by Jeramy Dodds
By Aaron Tucker
Broken Pencil
February 1 2009

The ghost of Glenn Gould possesses Crabwise to the Hounds, both as subject and as organizing agent. Gould, the eccentric pianist, was famous for humming and swaying as he moved through his strictly prescribed pieces, adding another simple layer of noise beneath the Bach or Beethoven he was playing. When listening to the recordings now, the listener is compelled to control it into bars and notes; yet always that strip of sound escapes, deep and personal, a steady hum from his lips.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Broken Pencil praises What Stirs

What Stirs by Margaret Christakos
By Tara-Michelle Ziniuk
Broken Pencil
February 1 2009

What is it about modern love? Margaret Christakos asks just this in her seventh collection of poetry, What Stirs, which reads like the sequel to an inside joke as written by a sexualities prof.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Broken Pencil notes Troubled

Troubled by RM Vaughan
By Angela Hibbs
Broken Pencil
October 1 2008

RM Vaughan's latest collection of poetry works on the tensions between betrayed and traitor. Telling the story of a therapist crossing the lines between therapist to become the speaker's lover with romance and tension and the added drama of Vaughan revealing in the endnotes that the case is autobiographical, this collection is potent and memorable. One particularly haunting piece is that of the letter Vaughan writes to the defence's legal counsel, with the therapist's name blacked out.

Related Content
Related Titles: 

Broken Pencil loves Hagiography

By Sarah Greene
Broken Pencil
November 22 2000

Some poets make beautiful, playful poems that remain coy and mysterious after reading and rereading. Jen Currin is of that kind. Hagiography (saint/holy writing/study) is a collection of poems that moves from death to birth, and visits gardens, houses, beds and streets on its way. It is hard to establish a sense of place in Currin's poems -- stay alert for clues.

Houses are extensions of Hagiography 's characters.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Broken Pencil girl-crushes on Stunt

By Kae McNemeny
Broken Pencil
November 22 6400

Claudia Dey should be your new girl crush. An attractive blonde with a relationship column in the Globe and Mail newspaper, I though her work may be comparable to, uh, Leah McLaren? But thankfully, it's not!

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Pulpy and Midge is Broken Pencil's Fiction Book of the Issue!

By Colleen Gillis
Broken Pencil
Issue 38

Pulpy and Midge is a very nice book about very nice people. Pulpy and Midge are gentle, kind, and in an enviable amount of love. Maybe I don't read enough books about nice people, but Pulpy really got to me.

Here is how nice Pulpy is: He wipes his feet at the door; he is kind to the receptionist; he feels guilty about not remembering her name. Sure, Pulpy can be too nice. But so what if he lets people finish his sentences?

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

The Girls Who Saw Everything win over Broken Pencil

By Nancy Duncan
Broken Pencil
Issue 38

At first I was skeptical about The Girls Who Saw Everything for the following reasons: (1) this book about a young women's book club is written by a man; (2) this young women's book club performs literary scenes, not in a theatre but in their lives, sometimes even involving unsuspecting strangers; (3) elements of the story include a robot, ancient cuneiform Gilgamesh stones and the Baghdad Blogger.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
Syndicate content