Canadian Literature

Lisa Robertson's Creative Confusion

Dougals Barber, from the journal Canadian Literature, on Lisa Robertson's enchanting sentences, which lie just south of the sensible. Lisa Robertson's Magenta Soul Whip, a compendium of the author's work since the mid '90s, came out in 2009:

The Many of One

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David McGimpsey on The Next Chapter

The podcast from David McGimpsey's January 17 appearance on The Next Chapter is now available from CBC Radio's web site.

Download it here: http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/nextchapter_20090117_10990.mp3.

Click here to read an excerpt from McGimpsey's Sitcom.

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Canadian Literature finds real substance in Reel Asian

By Victor Liang
Canadian Literature
December 20 2008

In the wake of the 'culture wars' of the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival was founded in 1997 by producer Anita Lee and journalist Andrew Sun as an event to showcase work from Asia and the Asian diaspora.

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Canadian Literature reviews Nerve Squall

By Meredith Quartermain
Canadian Literature
Spring 2007

Grumpiness as a major trope is hard to pull off over the length of an entire book. In Nerve Squall, which won the prestigious 2006 Griffin Prize, Sylvia Legris sustains this perspective with considerable panache. Through the lexicon of electrical storms, migraines, and Hitchcock-like threatening birds, Legris invokes an irritable world, full of foreboding and anxiety.

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Wanted: The Author

By Meredith Quartermain
Canadian Literature

“The removal of the author,” writes Roland Barthes, in his famous essay, “is not only a historical fact or an act of writing: it utterly transforms the modern text. . . . [T]he modern scriptor is born at the same time as his text; he is not furnished with a being which precedes or exceeds his writing.” Challenging and playing with this Barthian dilemma, Jill Hartman introduces a painted elephant as author-persona, who makes explicit what Barthes argues is implicit in all texts: “a fabric of quotations . . .

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