Quill & Quire

Quill & Quire listens to Rob Benvie's soundtrack

The Quill & Quire talked to Rob Benvie this November about the audio accompaniment to his new novel, Maintenance. Sue Carter Flinn interviewed Benvie and wrote up the story:

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Quill & Quire devours The Edible City

By David Leonard
Quill & Quire
January 1 2010

The Edible City addresses the past, present and future of food in Toronto. Like its predecessors – uTOpia, GreenTOpia and HTO – the book is a mix of political advocacy, social history and reportage.

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Amphibian named one of Quill and Quire's 2009's top overlooked books

The December 2009 issue of the Quill & Quire listed Carla Gunn's Amphibian as one of the 'overlooked books' of 2009 – a list of titles that, in a just world, would have been blockbuster bestsellers.

In their words:

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Quill & Quire digs The Mitochondrial Curiosities

By Deirdre Baker
Quill & Quire
May 21 2009

Your basic teen-attitude story in first person, present tense is now tediously commonplace. Nevertheless, there are occasional examples in which a sharp wit, a bitingly ironic voice, sheer quirkiness and Edmonton – yes, Edmonton – carry the day. The Mitochondrial Curiosities of Marcels 1 to 19, the debut novel from Jocelyn Brown, is one of them.

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Stunt earns double honours in Quill & Quire's Books of the Year

Claudia Dey's novel Stunt was chosen by Quill & Quire as one of 15 books to remember from 2008:

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Quill & Quire praises Crabwise to the Hounds

By Mark Callanan
Quill & Quire
December 1 2008

Despite my abiding conviction that a moratorium should be placed on poems about Glenn Gould (whose frequent appearance in Canadian poetry has made him into something of a verse cliché), I feel bound to admit that Jeramy Dodds imbues the clutch of Gould poems in his first collection with the same idiosyncratic brilliance that the famed concert pianist injected into his own art.

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Starred review for Stunt in the Quill & Quire

By Christina Decarie
Quill & Quire
June 2008

What would Lolita have been like if Nabokov had imagined a child obsessively, incestuously in love with a grown man, a man as capricious and oblivious as a little girl? What is Humbert Humbert and Lolita's roles had been reversed? The result would be Stunt, playwright Claudia Dey's first novel. Prefaced by a quote from Lolita, Dey's book begins as a Nabokovian delight, and Dey sustains this high level of writing throughout. The novel has lurking beauty, with strange pathways and a population of absurd characters.

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Quill and Quire reviews The Work of Days

By Zachariah Wells
Quill & Quire
December 2007

At her best, Lang's disjunctive syntax and taut, oblique episodes can be hauntingly moving. But she tends to overdo the po-mo alienation; some of the best passages in the book come when she gives her sentences and lines a bit more room to breathe. The Work of Days could be fairly classified as confessional, but there is nothing self-indulgent in the collection – unless you count its unremitting, monochromatic seriousness.

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Quill & Quire reviews Pulpy and Midge

By Ian Daffern
Quill & Quire
November 2007

Never mix business with pleasure. That's the moral of Jessica Westhead's new office novel Pulpy and Midge, whose titular couple strives to maintain a healthy balance of work and home life. Of course, balance can be heard to come by in a story about wife-swapping with the boss.

Pulpy is a pushover worker bee in an anonymous office, while Midge is his adorable, candle-obsessed wife. Together they present a sweet and sticky ideal of marital fidelity.

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Quill and Quire reviews The Girls Who Saw Everything

By Matthew Fox
Quill & Quire
July/August 2007

In fiction, homage is a tricky undertaking. Should an author indulge readers of the original, or satisfy those as yet unfamiliar? In The Girls Who Saw Everything, a resetting of The Epic of Gilgamesh in contemporary Montreal, Sean Dixon resoundingly chooses the former.

This is underlined by Dixon's creation of the Lacuna Cabal Montreal Young Women's Book Club, a crew of readers who deepen their understanding of literary works by acting them out.

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