Lori Emerson

Publishers Weekly reviews The Alphabet Game

By Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly
November 28 8000

This beautifully produced volume fills a large gap in 20th century North American poetry, selecting from the great long works of a master of profound whimsy, and also including arresting examples from his nearly impossible to find early works in concrete poetry. In addition to completing the six volume Martyrology before his untimely death, Nichol (1944 - 1988), who was born in Vancouver, wrote for the muppet-based children's show Fraggle Rock, and was a part of the seminal poetry performance troupe The Four Horsemen, which also included Steve McCaffery.

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Canadian Literature rejoices over The Alphabet Game

By Kit Dobson
Canadian Literature
November 28 2800

Those who have lamented the passing of the previous bpNichol reader, An H in the Heart, rejoice! The Alphabet Game is here to introduce a new generation of readers to the work of one of Canada’s most eclectic and exciting poets. An H in the Heart, Michael Ondaatje and George Bowering’s assemblage (McClelland & Stewart, 1994), was the staple introductory text—but it went out of print.

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The Alphabet Game surprises and delights

By Sarah Greene
Broken Pencil
November 28 0800

Barrie Phillip Nichol aka bpNichol experimented with visual and concrete poetry, performed as a member of The Four Horsemen and was a scriptwriter for Fraggle Rock.

The Alphabet Game surprised me with its earnest love of place and people – the poems take you along Toronto streets, on trips in trains, into human relationships. Nichol's poetry plays around with language: it pushes, stretches and jokes.

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bpNichol wows Bookforum

By Jed Rasula
Bookforum
Feb/Mar 2008

Bookforum recently published a great review of The Alphabet Game: a bpNichol reader:

Letters to the World

bpNichol’s poems celebrated the mutability of words

By JED RASULA

The Alphabet Game: A bpNichol Reader

by bpNichol

Who was the first blog poet? Wrong answer, whatever it was.

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Unnameable Books lists Top Books of 2007 (and we have 2!)

Unnameable Books in New York City has named their Top 10 Books of 2007, and Coach House Books has published two of them, The Alphabet Game and Human Resources!

Here's what the good people at Unnameable Books have to say:

5. THE ALPHABET GAME: a bpNichol reader
bpNichol, edited by Darren Wershler-Henry and Lori Emerson

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Two of Canada's Top Five!

The Poetry Foundation's blog has their picks for the top five avant-garde poetry books published in Canada in 2007, and Coach House published two of them!

The list includes The Alphabet Game, 'a compendium of material by bpNichol, the poet who has done more than any other writer to promote the values of linguistic radicalism in Canada', and Rachel Zolf’s Human Res

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Edmonton Journal: The Alphabet Game a 'wondrous gift'

By Douglas Barbour
Edmonton Journal
December 23, 2007

The late bpNichol, who died at the age of 44 in 1988, titled the seventh book of his lifelong poem, The Martyrology, Gifts. He believed that art was a gift, as were all examples of it, and as was the response to them. For the generations of readers who have come along since he died, The Alphabet Game should prove to be a monumental gift indeed, a wide-ranging introduction to the works of one of Canada's most gifted, and giving, radical imaginative writers.

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Torontoist gets lost in The Alphabet Game

By Prathna Lor
Torontoist
December 20, 2007

Over the past little while, Torontoist has been quietly absorbed in The Alphabet Game: A bpNichol Reader. Edited by Darren Wershler-Henry and Lori Emerson, The Alphabet Game is an essential anthology for any reader of bpNichol, and is a great starting point for those who have yet to discover his work.

Nichol, who is probably most well-known for his concrete and visual poetry, had achieved many things before dying at the age of 44.

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Alphabet Game interview at BlogTO

Popular Toronto newsblog BlogTO interviewed co-editor Lori Emerson about The Alphabet Game: A bpNichol Reader and bpNichol's work.

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The Alphabet Game an Ottawa Citizen Holiday Pick

On Sunday, December 2nd, the Ottawa Citizen asked Canadian authors what books they would love to give for the holidays, and what books they hope Santa will bring them.

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