review

Publishers Weekly names 'On Malice' as one of their highly anticipated Fall Poetry titles

By Alex Crowley
Publishers Weekly
June 20 2014

The big story this fall in poetry is the sheer number of Pulitzer Prize winners releasing new books—five out of six being collections of new work. Meanwhile, two major poets break new ground in their respective oeuvres, a poet under-recognized in the U.S. takes a cinematic turn, and three Henri Michaux works are translated into English for the first time.

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Publishers Weekly can't wait to read Lisa Robertson's 'Cinema of the Present'

By Alex Crowley
Publishers Weekly
June 20 2014

The big story this fall in poetry is the sheer number of Pulitzer Prize winners releasing new books—five out of six being collections of new work. Meanwhile, two major poets break new ground in their respective oeuvres, a poet under-recognized in the U.S. takes a cinematic turn, and three Henri Michaux works are translated into English for the first time.

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The Winnipeg Free Press praises Hancock's 'fearless collection'

By Jonathan Ball
Winnipeg Free Press
June 28 2014

In an age of assured debuts, Brecken Hancock's Broom Broom (Coach House, 72 pages, $18) might be the most bold. Reading like a visceral assault on now-clichés of feminist poetry, Hancock's lines tilt domestic stereotypes into nightmare.

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Geist Magazine is touched by bpNichol's poetry

By Jill Mandrake
Geist Magazine
September 1 2013

This review is available in issue 90 of Geist Magazine (Fall 2013).

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Margaux Williamson helps Lemon Hound See Everything Again

By Sina Queyras
Lemon Hound
June 23 2014
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The Montreal Gazette talks Teenage Head & getting punked in the Hammer

By Ian McGillis
The Montreal Gazette
June 18 2014

If BBAM Gallery in St-Henri didn’t already exist, some fever-dreaming true believer would surely be in the process of inventing it. Founded by Montrealer Ralph Alfonso on returning to his native city after a long national odyssey that included managing seminal Canadian punk band the Diodes, the multipurpose space on St-Jacques St. is a kind of shrine to a specific rock ’n’ roll esthetic, retro and contemporary at the same time.

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blogTO Explores What Happened to Teenage Head

By Rick McGinnis
blogTO
June 14 2014

Last week marked 34 years since the riot at Ontario Place that was the highpoint of the career of Teenage Head, the Hamilton punk band that attracted thousands of fans to the Forum, the circular waterfront amphitheatre that could only seat 3,000. The riot is a watershed moment in the history of the band, as told by Geoff Pevere in his recently released - and wonderfully titled - Gods Of The Hammer, but it was one from which they'd never recover.

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'These Canadian Punks Should've Been Huge' - CultMTL & GODS OF THE HAMMER

By Lorraine Carpenter
CultMTL
June 13 2014

Canadian author, critic and reporter Geoff Pevere was a university student in Ottawa when he first saw Teenage Head in 1978. Having formed as high school students in Hamilton in 1975, influenced by the same glam scene that laid the foundation for the bands that would make punk an international movement in late ’70s, Teenage Head were years ahead of other Canadian punks, most of whom weren’t radicalized until they saw the Sex Pistols on the news.

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12 or 20 Questions with Brecken Hancock

By Rob McLennan
rob mclennan's blog
June 13 2014

Brecken Hancock’s poetry, essays, interviews, and reviews have appeared in Lemon HoundThe Globe and Mail, Hazlitt, and Studies in Canadian Literature. She is Reviews Editor for Arc Poetry Magazine and Interviews Editor for Canadian Women in the Literary Arts. Her first book of poems, Broom Broom, is out with Coach House Books. She lives in Ottawa.

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Lemon Hound thoughtfully reflects on 'Needs Improvement' and what it means to be a poet

By Daniel Zomparelli
Lemon Hound
June 9 2014

What is it to press against the norm? To push back against the bullies using language, to be the Steve Urkels of society? In Jon Paul Fiorentino’s sixth collection, he sets out to deconstruct the language of pedagogy and what it means to “not fit in.”

To get a better understanding of the work, I interviewed JPF via Twitter. For the full interview, including what sandwich he ate that day, check out the hashtag #JPFneedsimprovement (special guest heckling during the interview include Mike Spry, Julie Mannell, Jason Christie and Dina Del Bucchia).

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