review

Arc raves about Joy Is So Exhausting

By Tanis MacDonald
Arc Poetry Magazine
July 1 2010

One of the open secrets of Canadian poetry is the number of women poets who are stop-the-presses funny in their explorations of contemporary womanhood. Jeanette Lynes, Sue Goyette, Adeena Karasick, Catherine Hunter…. I’m making a list, and Susan Holbrook’s at the top. While the various cultural reasons for this accruing of poetic gender comedy deserve a great deal of discussion, suffice to say that Holbrook’s follow-up to the comic linguistic accidents of misled (1999) feeds the feminist- comic fire with its cheeky-serious, sexy-goofy language games. Take the title.

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NewPages finds hope in Isobel and Emile

By Keith Meatto
NewPages
July 1 2010

Isobel and Emile is the story of two young lovers who separate and then try to survive on their own. The novel opens on the morning after their final consummation. Emile boards a train bound for his home in the city. Isobel stays in the town where they conducted their brief affair. For each one, the pain of separation becomes an existential crisis.

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The Mark News delves into Neighbour Procedure

By Erin Wunker
The Mark News
May 5 2010

Excerpted from The Mark News:

Neighbour Procedure engages. 'Grievable' is a poem that lists names of people who have been killed. The poem that follows is entitled 'Nominal.'

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Telegraph Journal on Isobel and Emile

By Heather Craig
The Telegraph Journal
May 1 2010

It's not surprising Alan Reed works in the realms of poetry, theatre and performance art. His first novel, Isobel & Emile, often reads like the latter, the narrative in carefully orchestrated declarations and observations.

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The New York Times loves Lisa Robertson's Magenta Soul Whip

By Stephen Burt
New York Times
April 22 2010

Here as in six earlier glittering books, Robertson proves hard to explain but easy to enjoy.

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Globe and Mail touched by Isobel and Emile

By Jim Bartley
Globe and Mail
April 23 2010

Excerpted from The Globe and Mail:

'Fiction must justify itself in every line,' Joseph Conrad said more than a century ago. Editors have quoted it to writers ever since. Rules, of course, can sometimes be broken with impunity, even with panache. Consider Alan Reed, a Montreal poet and student of semiotics. His stylistically audacious first novel jettisons the notion that every word and sentence must be necessary ...

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Winnipeg Free Press reviews Prismatic Publics, The Inquisition Yours

By Jennifer Still
Winnipeg Free Pres
April 24 2010

Prismatic Publics: Innovative Canadian Women's Poetry and Poetics (Coach House, 407 pages, $30) is the first anthology to exclusively showcase Canadian avant-garde women poets.

This is surprising considering the significant influence of the writers collected here and the four-decade time span in which some of them have been publishing.

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Cahiers de Corey on Neighbour Procedure

By Joshua Corey
Cahiers de Corey blog
February 19 2010

Joshua Corey at the Cahiers de Corey blog as given some preliminary thoughts on Rachel Zolf's Neighbour Procedure, along with Geoffrey Nutter's Christopher Sunset.

'A work of radical and rigorous empathy for Jew & Arab ... Zolf's world is raucous, contested, its heteroglossia weighted both ethically and aesthetically ... how physically beautiful the book is: its printing, and that gorgeously textured paper.'

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The Poetry Project Newsletter previews Neighbour Procedure

The Poetry Project Newsletter ran an advance review of Rachel Zolf's highly anticipated new collection, Neighbour Procedure, in their February/March 2010 issue.

Below is an excerpt from the review by Thom Donovan:

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The Poetry Project Newsletter previews Neighbour Procedure

By Thom Donovan
Poetry Project Newsletter
February 1 2010

The Poetry Project Newsletter ran an advance review of Rachel Zolf's highly anticipated new collection, Neighbour Procedure, in their February/March 2010 issue.

Below is an excerpt:

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