review

'These Canadian Punks Should've Been Huge' - CultMTL & GODS OF THE HAMMER

By Lorraine Carpenter
CultMTL
June 13 2014

Canadian author, critic and reporter Geoff Pevere was a university student in Ottawa when he first saw Teenage Head in 1978. Having formed as high school students in Hamilton in 1975, influenced by the same glam scene that laid the foundation for the bands that would make punk an international movement in late ’70s, Teenage Head were years ahead of other Canadian punks, most of whom weren’t radicalized until they saw the Sex Pistols on the news.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
in

12 or 20 Questions with Brecken Hancock

By Rob McLennan
rob mclennan's blog
June 13 2014

Brecken Hancock’s poetry, essays, interviews, and reviews have appeared in Lemon HoundThe Globe and Mail, Hazlitt, and Studies in Canadian Literature. She is Reviews Editor for Arc Poetry Magazine and Interviews Editor for Canadian Women in the Literary Arts. Her first book of poems, Broom Broom, is out with Coach House Books. She lives in Ottawa.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Lemon Hound thoughtfully reflects on 'Needs Improvement' and what it means to be a poet

By Daniel Zomparelli
Lemon Hound
June 9 2014

What is it to press against the norm? To push back against the bullies using language, to be the Steve Urkels of society? In Jon Paul Fiorentino’s sixth collection, he sets out to deconstruct the language of pedagogy and what it means to “not fit in.”

To get a better understanding of the work, I interviewed JPF via Twitter. For the full interview, including what sandwich he ate that day, check out the hashtag #JPFneedsimprovement (special guest heckling during the interview include Mike Spry, Julie Mannell, Jason Christie and Dina Del Bucchia).

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Maclean's praises Geoff Pevere's 'convincing enthusiasm' in 'Gods of the Hammer'

By Michael Barclay
Maclean's
June 6 2014
Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
in

The Toronto Star calls 'The Stonehenge Letters' 'completely engaging and delightful'

By Michel Basilières
Toronto Star
June 5 2014

The Stonehenge Letters is Harry Karlinsky’s second novel. Like his first, The Evolution Of Inanimate Objects, it’s presented as if it were a nonfiction book. It has an introduction, a postscript, appendices, a bibliography and photos, illustrations and diagrams. Oh, and footnotes.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
in

The Toronto Star sings the praises of the 'beautifully translated' Guyana

By Keith Garebian
Toronto Star
June 3 2014

Guyana, a small South American-Caribbean country of blended races and rancid violence and crime, was the site of one of the most notorious mass murder-suicides orchestrated by American cult leader Jim Jones, in November 1978. Ruled at the time by Forbes Burnham, an Afro-Guyanese, who went from being a political moderate to an extreme leftist, the country had in him and Jones two figures that were dictators of chaos.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
in

A great snapshot of 'Needs Improvement' on Contemporary Verse 2

Contemporary Verse 2
May 28 2014

Jon Paul Fiorentino's Needs Improvement "exceeds expectations." From "alyrical vilanelles" to a story told through report cards, Fiorentino's formal and thematic ideas are original, fresh, and funny. His deconstruction of accepted methods of media inspire us to reconstruct our own meaning in the gaps — the gaps in language, the gaps in communication, and the gaps in meaning — the absences of experience that we all share.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
in

A lovely snapshot of 'MxT' on Contemporary Verse 2

Contemporary Verse 2
May 28 2014

MxT stands for "Memory x Time," which is poet Sina Queyras' formula for measuring grief. In MxT, Queyras appropriates and deconstructs diagrams in a way that is both appealing and terrifying. We lose all sense of navigation through her rhythmic, nauseating, and beautifully honest repetition of loss.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
MxT
in

The National Post says Karlinsky takes you 'merrily by the nose'

By Michael Hingston
National Post
May 30 2014

Today, more than a century into their reign of the intellectual awards circuit, it’s easy to look at the Nobel Prizes and think of them as authoritative. They’re global awards, for one thing, not beholden to the politics of any one nation. For another, they’re extremely lucrative, to the tune of 8 million Swedish kronor (approximately $1.3 million CDN) — so they aren’t handed out lightly. And they’re dedicated to honouring the best and brightest of humanity’s achievements, in fields like physics, literature, and world peace.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
in

Geoff Pevere talks about the books that shaped him on Open Book: Toronto

By Grace
Open Book: Toronto
June 3 2014

If you want to talk pop culture in Toronto, you want to talk to Geoff Pevere. A veteran film critic with the Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail, he's lectured on film and media and was the co-author of the bestselling Mondo Canuck: A Canadian Pop Culture Odyssey.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
Syndicate content