review

The Toronto Star calls 'The Stonehenge Letters' 'completely engaging and delightful'

By Michel Basilières
Toronto Star
June 5 2014

The Stonehenge Letters is Harry Karlinsky’s second novel. Like his first, The Evolution Of Inanimate Objects, it’s presented as if it were a nonfiction book. It has an introduction, a postscript, appendices, a bibliography and photos, illustrations and diagrams. Oh, and footnotes.

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The Toronto Star sings the praises of the 'beautifully translated' Guyana

By Keith Garebian
Toronto Star
June 3 2014

Guyana, a small South American-Caribbean country of blended races and rancid violence and crime, was the site of one of the most notorious mass murder-suicides orchestrated by American cult leader Jim Jones, in November 1978. Ruled at the time by Forbes Burnham, an Afro-Guyanese, who went from being a political moderate to an extreme leftist, the country had in him and Jones two figures that were dictators of chaos.

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A great snapshot of 'Needs Improvement' on Contemporary Verse 2

Contemporary Verse 2
May 28 2014

Jon Paul Fiorentino's Needs Improvement "exceeds expectations." From "alyrical vilanelles" to a story told through report cards, Fiorentino's formal and thematic ideas are original, fresh, and funny. His deconstruction of accepted methods of media inspire us to reconstruct our own meaning in the gaps — the gaps in language, the gaps in communication, and the gaps in meaning — the absences of experience that we all share.

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A lovely snapshot of 'MxT' on Contemporary Verse 2

Contemporary Verse 2
May 28 2014

MxT stands for "Memory x Time," which is poet Sina Queyras' formula for measuring grief. In MxT, Queyras appropriates and deconstructs diagrams in a way that is both appealing and terrifying. We lose all sense of navigation through her rhythmic, nauseating, and beautifully honest repetition of loss.

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The National Post says Karlinsky takes you 'merrily by the nose'

By Michael Hingston
National Post
May 30 2014

Today, more than a century into their reign of the intellectual awards circuit, it’s easy to look at the Nobel Prizes and think of them as authoritative. They’re global awards, for one thing, not beholden to the politics of any one nation. For another, they’re extremely lucrative, to the tune of 8 million Swedish kronor (approximately $1.3 million CDN) — so they aren’t handed out lightly. And they’re dedicated to honouring the best and brightest of humanity’s achievements, in fields like physics, literature, and world peace.

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Geoff Pevere talks about the books that shaped him on Open Book: Toronto

By Grace
Open Book: Toronto
June 3 2014

If you want to talk pop culture in Toronto, you want to talk to Geoff Pevere. A veteran film critic with the Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail, he's lectured on film and media and was the co-author of the bestselling Mondo Canuck: A Canadian Pop Culture Odyssey.

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Margaux takes it all in with Adult Mag

By Ana Cecelia Alvarez
Adult Mag
May 23 2014

I first read about Margaux's show in a novel, a week before its opening in real life. I visited Mulherin + Pollard to view "I Could See Everything," and after a few free glasses of pinot grigio, left a note on Margaux's artist book. I scribbled, "Your palette, deeply murk mixing with the paint's sheen, shines like the shit of the world." Like her work, Marguax is unassuming, yet exacting in how she takes to the world. She's a painter’s painter, a rare breed it seems, someone who makes of their work the task of containing totality within a square frame and a hue of colors.

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The Globe & Mail features Margaux Williamson & 'I Could See Everything'

By James Adams
The Globe & Mail
May 23 2014

Margaux Williamson seems to be in full verbal flight this sunny afternoon in her airy studio overlooking the railroad tracks and gettin’-by businesses on the western outskirts of downtown Toronto. A font of effervescence, she has already admitted to a tendency “to say a million things in one sentence.” Now, in response to a question about her fondness for the “ugly beautiful” or the “beautiful ugly,” she’s observing how, from her perspective, “it’s pretty easy to make pretty things, to mimic pretty things.

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The Social's Jessica Allen talks Margaux Williamson and Seeing Everything

By Jessica Allen
The Social: The Jess Files
May 23 2014

Toronto painter Margaux Williamson had her first exhibit 13 years ago. The first time I saw her work was about a decade ago. I had recently completed a Masters in art history. I remember feeling pretty disillusioned with both academia and art. I was especially suspicious of contemporary art and the language often used to to describe the process of creating it, the artists and the art itself. The words felt as impenetrable as the works they described.

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The Bull Calf praises Leigh Kotsilidis' 'gutsy poetic debut'

By Graham Jensen
The Bull Calf
May 20 2014

“In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded,” claims Terry Pratchett in the epigraph to Hypotheticals, Leigh Kotsilidis’s gutsy poetic debut.

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