review

The Globe & Mail features Margaux Williamson & 'I Could See Everything'

By James Adams
The Globe & Mail
May 23 2014

Margaux Williamson seems to be in full verbal flight this sunny afternoon in her airy studio overlooking the railroad tracks and gettin’-by businesses on the western outskirts of downtown Toronto. A font of effervescence, she has already admitted to a tendency “to say a million things in one sentence.” Now, in response to a question about her fondness for the “ugly beautiful” or the “beautiful ugly,” she’s observing how, from her perspective, “it’s pretty easy to make pretty things, to mimic pretty things.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

The Social's Jessica Allen talks Margaux Williamson and Seeing Everything

By Jessica Allen
The Social: The Jess Files
May 23 2014

Toronto painter Margaux Williamson had her first exhibit 13 years ago. The first time I saw her work was about a decade ago. I had recently completed a Masters in art history. I remember feeling pretty disillusioned with both academia and art. I was especially suspicious of contemporary art and the language often used to to describe the process of creating it, the artists and the art itself. The words felt as impenetrable as the works they described.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

The Bull Calf praises Leigh Kotsilidis' 'gutsy poetic debut'

By Graham Jensen
The Bull Calf
May 20 2014

“In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded,” claims Terry Pratchett in the epigraph to Hypotheticals, Leigh Kotsilidis’s gutsy poetic debut.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Bookrageous talks 'All My Friends Are Superheroes,' Coach House Books & reading can lit!

Bookrageous
May 18 2014

Listen to the Bookrageous podcast by clicking through!

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Montecristo Magazine walks with Nicole Brossard's writing

By Robin Ramsey
Montecristo Magazine
May 1 2014

“My existence,” Nicole Brossard has said, “is a walk in writing.” It’s a fitting metaphor for the essential confluence of body and text that comprises the life of this prolific, versatile, and challenging writer. It is hard to label someone whose identity is insistently fluid, performative, and provisional: poet, novelist, essayist, dramatist, editor, public intellectual; or francophone, feminist, advocate, activist, avant-gardist. All fit Brossard, who has published over 30 collections of poetry and a dozen novels, among other works.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

The Huffington Post Sees Everything with Margaux Williamson

By Hilary Harkness
The Huffington Post
May 15 2014

When I walked into Margaux Williamson's show, I Could See Everything at Mulherin + Pollard gallery on the Lower East Side, I thought I knew what to expect. After all, I had been given the privilege of a sneak peek of sorts over brunch in Prospect Heights with Margaux and my girlfriend a few weeks prior.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Room Magazine discusses the raw needs of young women in Tamara Faith Berger's 'Little Cat'

By Nico Mara-McKay
Room Magazine
May 15 2014

Following the success of Maidenhead, which won The Believer Book Award in 2012, was short-listed for the Trillium Book Award in 2013, and was the most reviewed book of 2012 according to the Canadian Women in the Literary Arts Count, Coach House Books has released revised versions of Berger’s two earlier novels, Lie With Me (1999) and The Way of the Whore (2001), in a single volume titled Little Cat.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Matrix Magazine says 'Devil & the Detective' is 'a book that’s very good to its readers'

By Thomas S. Burke
Matrix Magazine
March 28 2014

John Golbach’s debut novel, The Devil and the Detective, can’t easily be folded into a genre. It’s a detective novel at its core, yes, but it’s not an iconic Raymond Chandler detective story, not exactly (though some Chandler can be found in there). It’s not really in the vein of an offbeat Jonathan Ames caper, either (but Ames is in there, too). It’s noir, yes, but, as Padgett Powell’s dust jacket blurb purports, “it’s noirtire, or satoir.”

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

James Karas on Sean Dixon's A God in Need of Help: 'Go see it.'

By James Karas
James Karas - Reviews and Views
May 8 2014

A God in Need of Help by Sean Dixon. What a marvelous play and what a terrific production by Tarragon Theatre. Go see it.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

View Magazine: 'Any Hamilton fan will be proud of this story'

By Ric Taylor
View Magazine
May 9 2014

Teenage Head: Gods of the Hammer

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
Syndicate content