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Bookrageous talks 'All My Friends Are Superheroes,' Coach House Books & reading can lit!

Bookrageous
May 18 2014

Listen to the Bookrageous podcast by clicking through!

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Montecristo Magazine walks with Nicole Brossard's writing

By Robin Ramsey
Montecristo Magazine
May 1 2014

“My existence,” Nicole Brossard has said, “is a walk in writing.” It’s a fitting metaphor for the essential confluence of body and text that comprises the life of this prolific, versatile, and challenging writer. It is hard to label someone whose identity is insistently fluid, performative, and provisional: poet, novelist, essayist, dramatist, editor, public intellectual; or francophone, feminist, advocate, activist, avant-gardist. All fit Brossard, who has published over 30 collections of poetry and a dozen novels, among other works.

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The Huffington Post Sees Everything with Margaux Williamson

By Hilary Harkness
The Huffington Post
May 15 2014

When I walked into Margaux Williamson's show, I Could See Everything at Mulherin + Pollard gallery on the Lower East Side, I thought I knew what to expect. After all, I had been given the privilege of a sneak peek of sorts over brunch in Prospect Heights with Margaux and my girlfriend a few weeks prior.

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Room Magazine discusses the raw needs of young women in Tamara Faith Berger's 'Little Cat'

By Nico Mara-McKay
Room Magazine
May 15 2014

Following the success of Maidenhead, which won The Believer Book Award in 2012, was short-listed for the Trillium Book Award in 2013, and was the most reviewed book of 2012 according to the Canadian Women in the Literary Arts Count, Coach House Books has released revised versions of Berger’s two earlier novels, Lie With Me (1999) and The Way of the Whore (2001), in a single volume titled Little Cat.

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Matrix Magazine says 'Devil & the Detective' is 'a book that’s very good to its readers'

By Thomas S. Burke
Matrix Magazine
March 28 2014

John Golbach’s debut novel, The Devil and the Detective, can’t easily be folded into a genre. It’s a detective novel at its core, yes, but it’s not an iconic Raymond Chandler detective story, not exactly (though some Chandler can be found in there). It’s not really in the vein of an offbeat Jonathan Ames caper, either (but Ames is in there, too). It’s noir, yes, but, as Padgett Powell’s dust jacket blurb purports, “it’s noirtire, or satoir.”

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James Karas on Sean Dixon's A God in Need of Help: 'Go see it.'

By James Karas
James Karas - Reviews and Views
May 8 2014

A God in Need of Help by Sean Dixon. What a marvelous play and what a terrific production by Tarragon Theatre. Go see it.

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View Magazine: 'Any Hamilton fan will be proud of this story'

By Ric Taylor
View Magazine
May 9 2014

Teenage Head: Gods of the Hammer

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The Puritan studies 'Indexical Elegies'

By Jesse Eckerlin
The Puritan
May 8 2014

Jon Paul Fiorentino takes his Post-Prairie fascinations, smart-ass inclinations, and pharmaceutically-impaired hipster stand-ins down a decidedly more somber path in his latest collection of poetry, Indexical Elegies.

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Hazlitt discusses Geoff Pevere's Gods of the Hammer and the Not-Fun History of Toronto

By Alan Jones
Hazlitt
May 8 2014

A month ago, The Board of Governors for Toronto’s Exhibition Place voted 4-3 in favour of banning all-ages electronic dance music (known to the kids as EDM) events at the city-owned venue. This decision, which may be reversed by City Council this week, was surrounded by a great deal of colourful language about “the children,” who have made for a convenient political volleyball of late, having also been cast at the centre of The Beer Store’s scaremongering campaign to prevent competition from convenience stores.

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Canuckistan Music calls 'Gods of the Hammer' 'thoroughly enjoyable'

By Michael Panontin
Canuckistan Music
May 2 2014

There is allegedly a saying down in Hamilton, the gritty steeltown just down the Q.E.W. from Toronto, that goes something like this: "The only reason Toronto had any punk rock is because Teenage Head drove up the highway and showed them how to do it." And though that may sound like small-town bluster, when Frankie Venom, Gord Lewis, Steve Mahon and Nick Stipanitz showed up at the Colonial Tavern on Yonge Street in early 1977, they blew the local competition out of the water.

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