review

Pank Magazine hails BROOM BROOM as the emergence of a significant new voice

By Adam Sol
Pank Magazine
August 29 2014

Grief is one of our first reasons for inventing poetry: the urge to inscribe a loss that cannot be recovered. Gilgamesh’s Enkidu, Homer’s Achilles, Jeremiah’s Jerusalem, Shelley’s Keats, Ginsberg’s mother, Olds’ father, Mary Jo Bang’s son – all have been memorably recorded and mourned in verse.

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The Los Angeles Review loves the personal mythology Hancock creates in BROOM BROOM

By Michael Luke Benedetto
The Los Angeles Review
August 29 2014

Broom Broom
Poems by Brecken Hancock
Coach House Books, April 2014
ISBN-13: 978-1552452882
$17.95; 69pp.
Reviewed by Michael Luke Benedetto

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Toronto Life excerpts 'What is brunch, anyway?'

Toronto Life
August 22 2014

From Toronto Life:

Toronto writer Shawn Micallef believes we should all be thinking a lot more about brunch. His new book, The Trouble With Brunch, was published last month by Coach House Books; it’s part-autobiography, part-history, and part-dissertation, all with the aim of examining the relationship between the weekend ritual and shifting attitudes toward class and leisure. Here’s an excerpt.

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The Puritan talks to Shawn Micallef about The Trouble with Brunch

By Jason Freure & Tyler Willis
The Puritan
August 24 2014

The following interview was conducted via email in summer 2014.

 

Jason Freure & Tyler Willis: The Trouble with Brunch is a “book about class,” and you focus on three classes: the working class, middle class, and “creative class.” Can you summarize the differences?

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The Malahat Review calls 'MxT' a 'vital work by an increasingly essential Canadian writer'

By Paul Franz
The Malahat Review
August 21 2014

Electrical currents, currents of rivers and oceans, floods, rains, skies like “wet wool,” the “humming silence” lurking in “civic pools”: such is the sensory landscape, alternately luscious and impoverished, familiar and apocalyptic, of Sina Queyras’s fourth poetry collection, M×T. Both aesthetically and thematically—in its concern with the trauma of loss, especially the loss of family members—it is evidently linked to her previous book, 2012’s stunning debut novel Autobiography of Childhood.

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Cinema of the Present is a 'most anticipated fall 2014' poetry title on The 49th Shelf

By Kerry Clare
The 49th Shelf
August 18 2014

Lisa Robertson's Cinema of the Present was listed as one of The 49th Shelf's most anticipated titles of fall 2014 in their 'Poetry Preview.' You can read the entire list here.

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The Toronto Star hates brunch perhaps even more than Shawn Micallef!

By Christine Sismondo
Toronto Star
August 17 2014

True confession: I hate brunch.

I hate the barely disguised mix of stress and contempt on my server’s face. I hate being rushed through mediocre and overpriced frittatas so my table can be turned. And, as a self-employed person who works most every day, I resent that brunch interrupts prime working hours. Maybe if I was a day-drinker, I’d at least find some joy in the bottom of my mimosa glass. But, I’m not and I don’t.

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The National Post reflects on leisure time with Shawn Micallef's THE TROUBLE WITH BRUNCH

By Maryam Siddiqi
National Post
August 15 2014

Remember when food was just something you ate three times a day (and maybe a few times more)? Fuel. Sustenance. Now it is a culture, fashion, celebrity, a symbol of who we are and how we choose to live our lives. What does this say about it and us, and is it really as annoying as it seems? (Short answer: Yes.) Two new books explore these current notions of food; the first is lighthearted, the second less so, but both are serious examinations of our relationships with food.

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Maclean's praises Micallef's successful, thought-provoking take on brunch

By Anne Kingston
Maclean's Magazine
August 11 2014

Brunch has long been ripe for ridicule. In 2000, Anthony Bourdain took a cleaver to it, metaphorically speaking, in Kitchen Confidential, a book destined to dissuade anyone from ordering eggs benedict ever again.

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The Globe & Mail and Shawn Micallef talk about THE TROUBLE WITH BRUNCH

By Zosia Bielski
The Globe & Mail
August 7 2014

Rachael Popowich knows the brunch orders before her customers step in to Aunties & Uncles, the Toronto restaurant where she cooks. Old girlfriends catching up will split a savoury menu item and a sweet one, drinking “lots of teas.” Packs of guys roll in hungover, ordering mountains of burgers, breakfast pockets and juice.

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