review

Eclectic Ruckus says that BROOM BROOM 'definitely announces a talent worth paying attention to'

By Douglas Barbour
Eclectic Ruckus
July 28 2014

Somehow I’ve managed to miss Brecken Hancock’s work in magazines & chapbooks, but her bright, fizzy, fast & furious book, so full of energy, wit, & odd & jarring juxtapositions, definitely announces a talent worth paying attention to. Broom Broom sweeps aside a lot of conventional cobwebs while offering a richly bracing series of views of history (through bathtubs), family troubles, & the usual mix of love, friendship, anger, etc.

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Jacket2 praises Decomp's compelling witness to a plural future

By Tyrone Williams
Jacket2
July 11 2014

Stephen Collis and Jordan Scott, Decomp (Coach House Books, 2013), 135 pp. $24.95 CAN, $22.00 USA—Full disclosure: I am quoted toward the end of this book and cited in the notes.

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VOICE registers Jordan Scott, 90s R&B and Blert

By New Museum’s Department of Education and Public Engagement
New Museum R&D Seasons: Voice
July 14 2014

In this edition of VOICE Registers, New Museum R&D (Research & Development) Season Fellow Kaegan Sparks speaks with poet & critic Jordan Scott about speech disfluencies, state interrogation procedures, glottal stops, Blert and stuttering in 90s R&B.

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Eclectic Ruckus says MxT 'should be on every reader's bookshelf'

By Douglas Barbour
Eclectic Ruckus
February 24 2014

How write elegy in the 21st Century? One way is to go back through all the layers of inscription to the beginnings (which in a way Ann Carson does), but the weight of eons of such works is heavy indeed. And perhaps individual loss has lost some of its lustre as we watch each day the thousands dying around the world. Yet both our sense of loss & outrage at death both personal & public invites the writer to respond.

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The LPG names All My Friends are Superheroes as a must-read for 'lovers who laugh'

LPG Staff Blog
July 23 2014

Stephen Leacock’s classic story collection, Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town, and its fictional setting of small-town Mariposa has delighted audiences for 102 years. Before and since, Canadians have upheld a long tradition of hilarity, in whatever circumstances – and this nationwide sense of humour is being celebrated this week at the Leacock Summer Festival in Orillia. This selection of eight side-clutching LPG titles is sure to leave you laughing. Figure out how you’d like to be tickled (so to speak), and then go from there.

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Windsor's The Urbanite digests The Trouble with Brunch, over easy

By Jon Liedtke
The Urbanite
July 16 2014

You might not think of brunch as a lens to study class issues, but author and urbanist Shawn Micallef found after moving to Toronto from Windsor 14 years ago that it was the perfect way to delve into the subject for his new book, The Trouble with Brunch.

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Kingston Life can't wait to read 'The Poetic Edda'

By Filza Naveed
Kingston Life
July 1 2014

Kingston Life has put together a list of five titles to help get everyone excited about the Kingston WritersFest, and it features our very own Jeramy Dodds' translation of The Poetic Edda

You can view the article online here.

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3:AM Magazine talks to all the smartest people in the world: Margaux Williamson

By Joanna Pocock
3:AM Magazine
July 14 2014

One of the last things Margaux Williamson asks before we go our separate ways is whether she should wear heels tonight.

“Not super high heels,” she corrects herself. “Boots with a bit of a heel. Or should I wear my Keds?” she asks looking down at her orange-clad feet.

“Boots,” I reply.

“And a dress?”

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Cleaver Magazine dreams with Margaux Williamson in 'I Could See Everything'

By Gabriel Chazan
Cleaver Magazine
July 14 2014

There’s something otherworldly about the actress Scarlett Johansson. Earlier this year she played an alien in Under The Skin and, in one of the most striking paintings in the artist Margaux Williamson’s new book, I Could See Everything, she plays the universe. The painting, called I thought I saw the whole universe, is a portrait of Johansson—or more precisely the infinite landscape represented by her wearing Versace for The New York Times.

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The National Post praises Mullins' 'excellent translation' of Turcotte's 'taut lyricism'

By Brendan de Caires
National Post
July 11 2014

After her Guyanese hairdresser dies in an apparent suicide, Ana, a freelance journalist in Montreal, tries to console herself by delving into the dead woman’s backstory. Along the way she imagines what it was like to grow up in the enigmatic English-speaking South American country at the heart of the mystery. Kimi, the hairdresser is a Georgetown dougla (from doogala, a Hindi-Bhojpuri for “bastard,” among other pejoratives), of mixed Afro- and Indo-Guyanese parentage, and thus an heir to the tormented legacies of slavery and indentureship.

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