review

Windsor's The Urbanite digests The Trouble with Brunch, over easy

By Jon Liedtke
The Urbanite
July 16 2014

You might not think of brunch as a lens to study class issues, but author and urbanist Shawn Micallef found after moving to Toronto from Windsor 14 years ago that it was the perfect way to delve into the subject for his new book, The Trouble with Brunch.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Kingston Life can't wait to read 'The Poetic Edda'

By Filza Naveed
Kingston Life
July 1 2014

Kingston Life has put together a list of five titles to help get everyone excited about the Kingston WritersFest, and it features our very own Jeramy Dodds' translation of The Poetic Edda

You can view the article online here.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

3:AM Magazine talks to all the smartest people in the world: Margaux Williamson

By Joanna Pocock
3:AM Magazine
July 14 2014

One of the last things Margaux Williamson asks before we go our separate ways is whether she should wear heels tonight.

“Not super high heels,” she corrects herself. “Boots with a bit of a heel. Or should I wear my Keds?” she asks looking down at her orange-clad feet.

“Boots,” I reply.

“And a dress?”

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

Cleaver Magazine dreams with Margaux Williamson in 'I Could See Everything'

By Gabriel Chazan
Cleaver Magazine
July 14 2014

There’s something otherworldly about the actress Scarlett Johansson. Earlier this year she played an alien in Under The Skin and, in one of the most striking paintings in the artist Margaux Williamson’s new book, I Could See Everything, she plays the universe. The painting, called I thought I saw the whole universe, is a portrait of Johansson—or more precisely the infinite landscape represented by her wearing Versace for The New York Times.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
in

The National Post praises Mullins' 'excellent translation' of Turcotte's 'taut lyricism'

By Brendan de Caires
National Post
July 11 2014

After her Guyanese hairdresser dies in an apparent suicide, Ana, a freelance journalist in Montreal, tries to console herself by delving into the dead woman’s backstory. Along the way she imagines what it was like to grow up in the enigmatic English-speaking South American country at the heart of the mystery. Kimi, the hairdresser is a Georgetown dougla (from doogala, a Hindi-Bhojpuri for “bastard,” among other pejoratives), of mixed Afro- and Indo-Guyanese parentage, and thus an heir to the tormented legacies of slavery and indentureship.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
in

The Toronto Star looks forward to seeing David Balzer & Margaux Williamson at this year's WOTS

By Graham Slaughter
Toronto Star
July 10 2014

The Word on the Street Toronto festival has released its fall lineup, featuring Man Booker Prize-nominated Emma Donoghue, artist Margaux Williamson, investigative reporter Robyn Doolittle and children’s author Kenneth Oppel.

Now in its 25th year, the annual book festival will transform Queen’s Park Circle on Sept. 21 into a hub of literary conversations, signings and poetry slams, and hosts some of the biggest names in Canadian publishing.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
in

The Quill & Quire says Guyana is a 'book that should not be ignored'

By Joy Parks
Quill & Quire
July 1 2014

Rhonda Mullins’ translation of Montreal writer Élise Turcotte’s 2011 novel instantly transports readers into a cramped world that nearly shimmers with fear.

Ana is clinging to a tenuous bond with her touch-averse young son, Philippe, after the death of her husband, Rudi, leaves them both traumatized. Their one locus of calm involves the haircuts Philippe receives from Kimi, a Guyanese immigrant who seems bound for better things than employment at a dingy neighbourhood salon.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
in

Publishers Weekly loves how The Stonehenge Letters 'seamlessly combines the real and the imagined'

Publishers Weekly
July 7 2014

The author of The Evolution of Inanimate Objects intrigues with his second novel, an ambitious blend of fact and fiction. The reserved, unnamed narrator, a "retired psychiatrist and amateur historian" sets out to discover why Sigmund Freud never received a Nobel Prize, hoping to justify a career built upon Freud's "no longer venerated" theories. The plot changes course when his research reveals the existence of a curious contest established by Alfred Nobel: 60,000 Swedish kronor to the person who solves the mystery of Stonehenge.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
in

New York Magazine sees everything with Margaux Williamson

By Erica Schwigershausen
New York Magazine
July 3 2014

 

First conceived during a trip to the Yukon in 2009, the work in the book spans five years, and plays with the relationship between imagination and the real world. In fact, the book's conceit is that it's a collection of paintings for the imaginary Road at the Top of the World Museum, curated by Ann Marie Pena.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 

The Toronto Star: 'A God in Need of Help' is a compelling look at the mystery of faith

By Robert Crew
Toronto Star
April 24 2014

It’s certainly an intriguing tale.

In 1606, the four strongest men in Venice were hired by Rudolf II of Austria to carry a large painting — Durer’s Brotherhood of the Rosary — from Venice across the Alps to Prague.

And this true story is the basis for Sean Dixon’s new play, A God in Need of Help, now at Tarragon Theatre.

Related Content
Related Contributors: 
Related Titles: 
in
Syndicate content