Toronto Star

Cordelia Strube: one of Heather Mallick's best arts-and-smarts people of 2010!

On Monday, December 27, 2010, Toronto Star columnist Heather Mallick announced her list of the 'best arts-and-smarts people' of 2010. Alongside American novelist Joyce Carol Oates and Obama assistant Elizabeth Warren was Lemon author Cordelia Strube.

From The Star:

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Saudade reviewed in the Star's roundup of travel books

By Michael Hanlon
Toronto Star
December 13 2008

Anik See's Saudade is another title that requires explanation. It's a Portuguese word with no direct English translation. But a Portuguese friend tells me it means a longing for somewhere, someone or an experience that is now past.

For See, who travels widely but divides the rest between Canada and the Netherlands, it seems to represent relishing a simple life and regretting modern, stifling intrusions on old shores (as in new developments in old Amsterdam).

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The Steve Machine draws accolades from the Star

By Geoff Pevere
Toronto Star
November 23 2008

Of the three human enterprises most often named as means to defy death — religion, art and sex — Mike Hoolboom's novel The Steve Machine is most heartily concerned with the latter two.

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The Star celebrates new Coach House AGO exhibit

In a Toronto Star profile of the transformed AGO, published on November 14 (the gallery's official public opening day), Peter Goddard gave a rave review of the Coach House Press exhibit. And while he found the space devoted to artist David Milne somewhat 'excessive,' suggesting the gallery 'give a little more breathing space to the bacchanalian spirit coming from its riotous installation of art associated with Coach House Press,' Coach Housers couldn't get enough of Milne, who also has a piece adorning their walls.

Toronto Star on HTO and historic mills

The Toronto Star's Kenneth Kidd explores the intersection of his own family history and Toronto's political and natural histories in an article that draws from HTO, the latest non-fiction release from Coach House Books.

From the article:

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HTO

Saudade featured in the Toronto Star

Today’s edition of the Toronto Star (September 25th, 2008) features a vivid excerpt from Anik See’s travel memoir, Saudade, which launches tonight at Type Books in Toronto.

Visit the link below to read the whole story.

We were going to drive to Darwin, and it's a long drive, but I wanted to see something authentic.

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The Star Reviews Jen Currin's Hagiography

By Barbara Carey
Toronto Star

There’s a passage in When the Devil Holds the Candle, by the Norwegian mystery writer Karin Fossum, in which her detective, obviously a literary sort, reflects on what he likes about poetry: "It's like playing Virtual Reality, he thought. Poof! -- and you're in a different landscape."

The landscape in both of today’s collections is familiar, in a way.

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Toronto Star raves about Stunt

By Patricia Robertson
Toronto Star
April 20, 2008

Shipwrecked in magic Parkdale

A local playwright has an entertaining ball with a rich kingdom around the King car

April 20, 2008

Patricia Robertson

Claudia Dey's magical and sensuous first novel, Stunt, is a triumphant launch to the award-winning playwright's literary career. Dey has produced a remarkable piece of magic realism.

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Sean Dixon profiled in the Toronto Star

Sean Dixon, author of The Girls Who Saw Everything, was interviewed by the Toronto Star this Monday, July 9, on the day of his Scream in High Park performance.

See the interview at http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/article/233736.

Employing a novel approach to playwriting

July 09, 2007
Vit Wagner<
Publishing Reporter

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Toronto Star roots for The Milk Chicken Bomb

By Nancy Wigston
Toronto Star
June 17, 2007

A lonely schoolyard prince plots some choice revenge

Calgary rocker debuts with a 10-year-old hero who remains as nameless as his unspoken fear, but we cheer the kid on in the end

June 17, 2007

Nancy Wigston

The Milk Chicken Bomb

by Andrew Wedderburn

Coach House, 291 pages, $21.95

This odd, mysterious first novel is narrated by a 10-year-old boy living in the fictional town of Marvin, outside Calgary.

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