interview

The Puritan talks to Shawn Micallef about The Trouble with Brunch

By Jason Freure & Tyler Willis
The Puritan
August 24 2014

The following interview was conducted via email in summer 2014.

 

Jason Freure & Tyler Willis: The Trouble with Brunch is a “book about class,” and you focus on three classes: the working class, middle class, and “creative class.” Can you summarize the differences?

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Shawn Micallef shares his beef with brunch on CBC Radio Q

By Guest Host Stephen Quinn
CBC Radio Q
August 7 2014

On Thursday, August 7, Shawn Micallef joined guest host Stephen Quinn on CBC Radio Q to discuss The Trouble with Brunch, his provocative new book that critiques our contemporary food obsession and status anxiety. Micallef unpacks the layered meanings of the late morning meal, and explores what "the brunching class" can learn about contemporary culture and politics.

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Shawn Micallef gets Proustian on Open Book: Toronto

By Grace O'Connell
Open Book: Toronto
July 23 2014

Shawn Micallef is as much a part of Toronto as standing in line for an hour on Sunday morning to get the perfect eggs Benedict. As senior editor and co-owner of Spacing magazine and a columnist for the Toronto Star, Shawn's writing on public space, Toronto history and cultural politics is an essential part of the Toronto conversation.

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Windsor's The Urbanite digests The Trouble with Brunch, over easy

By Jon Liedtke
The Urbanite
July 16 2014

You might not think of brunch as a lens to study class issues, but author and urbanist Shawn Micallef found after moving to Toronto from Windsor 14 years ago that it was the perfect way to delve into the subject for his new book, The Trouble with Brunch.

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3:AM Magazine talks to all the smartest people in the world: Margaux Williamson

By Joanna Pocock
3:AM Magazine
July 14 2014

One of the last things Margaux Williamson asks before we go our separate ways is whether she should wear heels tonight.

“Not super high heels,” she corrects herself. “Boots with a bit of a heel. Or should I wear my Keds?” she asks looking down at her orange-clad feet.

“Boots,” I reply.

“And a dress?”

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New York Magazine sees everything with Margaux Williamson

By Erica Schwigershausen
New York Magazine
July 3 2014

 

First conceived during a trip to the Yukon in 2009, the work in the book spans five years, and plays with the relationship between imagination and the real world. In fact, the book's conceit is that it's a collection of paintings for the imaginary Road at the Top of the World Museum, curated by Ann Marie Pena.

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blogTO Explores What Happened to Teenage Head

By Rick McGinnis
blogTO
June 14 2014

Last week marked 34 years since the riot at Ontario Place that was the highpoint of the career of Teenage Head, the Hamilton punk band that attracted thousands of fans to the Forum, the circular waterfront amphitheatre that could only seat 3,000. The riot is a watershed moment in the history of the band, as told by Geoff Pevere in his recently released - and wonderfully titled - Gods Of The Hammer, but it was one from which they'd never recover.

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12 or 20 Questions with Brecken Hancock

By Rob McLennan
rob mclennan's blog
June 13 2014

Brecken Hancock’s poetry, essays, interviews, and reviews have appeared in Lemon HoundThe Globe and Mail, Hazlitt, and Studies in Canadian Literature. She is Reviews Editor for Arc Poetry Magazine and Interviews Editor for Canadian Women in the Literary Arts. Her first book of poems, Broom Broom, is out with Coach House Books. She lives in Ottawa.

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Kenneth Goldsmith talks to Margaux Williamson painting in "this flat-screen world" for The Believer

Kenneth Goldsmith (author of Uncreative Writing and other books; also the first Poet Laureate of the Museum of Modern Art; AND the creator of UbuWeb which collects important avant-garde artworks for free consumption by all) spoke with Margaux Williamson about I Could See Everything, her paintings in "this flat-screen world."

You can see the entire interview on The Believer Logger.

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Check out Sean's 'Playwrights in Profile' feature on Open Book: Toronto!

Toronto playwright and fiction writer Sean Dixon's latest dramatic offering is A God in Need of Help (Coach House Books), in which four 17th century Catholic men are charged with transporting a holy painting across the alps. The men are attacked by Protestant zealots, and what happens next is thought to be a miracle.

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