Toronto water

HTO captivates Canadian Architect

HTO: Toronto's Water from Lake Iroquois to Lost Rivers to Low-flow Toilets, edited by Wayne Reeves and Christina Palassio
By Ian Chodikoff
Canadian Architect
February 1 2009

Despite the manipulation of eco-systems to accommodate our growing cities, the rivers that exist beneath the morass of urbanity can never entirely disappear. This recent publication contains 34 essays to delight the reader, with stories about Toronto's natural systems and man-made infrastructure pertaining to the provision, purification and protection of its water. Reading about watersheds has never been so engaging!

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Canadian Water Treatment lauds 'invaluable' HTO

Urban Flow: HTO in review
By Tina Chu
Canadian Water Treatment
January 1 2009

Toronto and its surrounding waters may be obvious topics in Coach House Press' recent collection, HTO: Toronto's Water from Lake Iroquois to Lost Rivers to Low-flow Toilets, but readers might be surprised to discover what else the collection of 29 essays washes up.

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HTO post on Torontoist.com

Read the Torontoist's blog entry discussing HTO and Toronto water, accompanied by a stunning photograph, at http://torontoist.com/2009/02/its_a_waterful_life.php.

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Corporate Knights champions HTO

By Monika Warzecha
Corporate Knights
January 1 2009

Getting someone outside of the 416 area code to read HTO: Toronto’s Water from Lake Iroquois to Lost Rivers to Low-flow Toilets may be a hard sell. But early on, the book reminds us that water is a connective force. In the Introduction, editors Wayne Reeves and Christina Palassio explain, 'The future of Toronto's water is not ours alone. Despite what we do here, it matters what happens in Thunder Bay and Thornhill. And what we do affects Kingston and Quebec City. We are all downstream.'

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HTO makes a cameo in Toronto's sewer story

In an article for the Toronto Star entitled 'Getting to Know Toronto's Sewers', HTO contributor Shawn Micallef compares the buried history of Toronto's vast sewer works with the celebrated sewer sagas of Paris and New York.

Get the full story here: http://www.thestar.com/article/568902 and in the authoritative HTO.

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Eye Weekly gleans fun facts from HTO

Eye Weekly brings you a glass half empty vs. glass half full comparison events and facts dotting the history of Toronto's water, all of which have been gleaned from the authoritative HTO: Toronto's Water from Lake Iroquois to Lost Rivers to Low-flow toilets.

Visit the feature here: http://www.eyeweekly.com/features/article/46355.

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HTO feature and podcast on CIUT 89.5FM

On November 13, U of T radio network CIUT 89.5FM aired a feature on HTO: Toronto's Water from Lake Iroquois to Lost Rivers to Low-flow Toilets.

Download the podcast at http://archives.take5.fm/.

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HTO Panel: The Future of Toronto's Water

Nov 27

The Toronto Green Community hosts a discussion about the future of Toronto's water at Hart House on Thursday, November 27.

The panel, moderated by the Clean Water Foundation's Christopher Hilkene, brings together contributors to HTO: Toronto's Water from Lake Iroquois to Lost Rivers to Low-flow Toilets

Location: 
Hart House Debates Room
7 Hart House Circle
Toronto, ON
Canada
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Globe and Mail on HTO and civic water works

Globe columnist John Barber cites HTO, the latest non-fiction title from Coach House Books, in his article on recent and future developments in Toronto's civic water works.

From the article:

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Toronto Star on HTO and historic mills

The Toronto Star's Kenneth Kidd explores the intersection of his own family history and Toronto's political and natural histories in an article that draws from HTO, the latest non-fiction release from Coach House Books.

From the article:

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