Margaret Christakos

Nicole Brossard launches Fences in Breathing at TINARS

Apr 14

Is it possible to write a novel in poetic verse? Can you write in a language that's not yours? Famed experimental author, poet and feminist Nicole Brossard speaks with Margaret Christakos (What Stirs), a fellow cross-genre writer about the relative merits of writing novels and poetry, and what happens when one bleeds into another.

Location: 
The Gladstone Hotel
1214 Queen Street West
Toronto, ON
Canada
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NewPages stirs to Christakos's challenge

By Vince Corvaia
NewPages
January 6 2008

Reading Margaret Christakos's poetry on the page is like reading sheet music. You don't get the full effect until you hear it. And when you do hear it, when you read it aloud to yourself, you realize that the music is wildly experimental and takes some participation. Christakos, in What Stirs, challenges you to meet her halfway. There's nothing passive about these poems.

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Blogger delves into What Stirs

A recent post on the evocatively-named blog, Organ Spurt, digs deep into the poetics and politics of Margaret Christakos's What Stirs, drawing several comparisons to other writers and movements.

Read on at http://organspurt.blogspot.com/2008/12/what-stirs-uses-procedure-to-better.html.

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Talk by Margaret Christakos posted on the Agora Review

Read Margaret Christakos's introductory comments to the final gathering of Influency 5, courtesy of the Agora Review: http://www.agorareview.ca/?q=node/165.

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Margaret Christakos on The Next Chapter podcast

CBC's The Next Chapter interviews Margaret Christakos, whose latest collection of poetry is What Stirs.

Download the podcast at http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/nextchapter_20081122_9442.mp3. Christakos's feature comprises the last seven minutes or so.

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Meredith Quartermain reads Margaret Christakos

Sina Queyras's Lemon Hound blog hosts Meredith Quartermain reading the narrative layering of 'Queen,' a poem from Margaret Christakos's latest collection, What Stirs.

From the post:

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Margaret Christakos at the Art Bar

Nov 18

November 18 at Clinton's (693 Bloor Street West), the Art Bar poetry series presents award-winning poet Margaret Christakos reading from her new collection, What Stirs, alongside poets David Clink and Maurice Mierau.

Visit the full calendar of Art Bar Readings at http://www.artbar.org/calendar.html.

The Art Bar Poetry Series
featuring Margaret Christakos, David Clink and Maurice Mierau
Tuesday, November 18, 2008
Clinton's, 693 Bloor Street West

Location: 
Clinton's
693 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON
Canada
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'Ten Questions with Margaret Christakos' on Open Book Toronto

Open Book Toronto interviews Margaret Christakos just in time for the Toronto launch of her new poetry collection, What Stirs, on November 6 at David Mirvish Books.

Read what Christakos has to say about the writing process, her influences and her latest project:

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Margaret Christakos profiled on Lemon Hound blog

Read what Sina Queyras, author of Lemon Hound (from which her blog takes its name) has to say about the poetics and politics of fellow Coach House poet Margaret Christakos.

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What Stirs acclaimed by Winnipeg Free Press

By Maurice Mierau
Winnipeg Free Press
September 28 2008

Toronto writer Margaret Christakos’ seventh collection is What Stirs (Coach House, 120 pages, $17), and it is stirring both emotionally and in a bold experimentalism.

The ambitious title poem and several others use phrasal sequencing, a technique older than written poetry that brings a musical dimension to the material.

Christakos’ work is often very funny in using the language of the lyric against itself: 'The way to San Jose is aquiver/ with few and fewer friends', or 'Mauve hydrangea heads nodded off in front of my laptop/ with the pallor of popped vivacity.'

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