sound poetry

Paul Dutton performs in Ottawa

Jun 6

The A B Series hosts the first of two performances by Paul Dutton (Aurealities), premier Canadian sound poet and founding member of The Four Horsemen, on Saturday, June 6. The performance takes place at 1848 (University of Ottawa campus bar) at 9 p.m. Presented in association with U of O's English Department.

Location: 
1848 - University of Ottawa campus bar
Jock Turcot University Centre 85 University Avenue - 2nd Floor
Ottawa, ON
Canada
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Christian Bök's Atwater Library performance online

Listen to a new recording of Christian Bök (Eunoia) performing sound poetry at the Atwater Poetry Project on May 12, 2009.

Visit http://www.atwaterlibrary.ca/en/node/694.

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Christian Bök at Ottawa's A B Series

May 16

On Saturday, May 16, Christian Bök (Eunoia) performs in Ottawa for the first time since 2002! The event, presented by the A B Series and the Canadian Tulip Festival, takes place at 5 p.m. in the Mirror Tent at City Hall's Festival Plaza (110 Laurier Ave West). Visit the A B Series for information on where to buy tickets.

Location: 
Festival Plaza at Ottawa City Hall
Mirror Tent 110 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, ON
Canada
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Steve McCaffery & Karen Mac Cormack in Glasgow

Mar 18

Steve McCaffery (Seven Pages Missing) and Karen Mac Cormack (At Issue) read and talk about their work at Glasgow's Centre for Contemporary Arts on Wednesday, March 18, for the Instal Music Festival. The event begins at 7:30 p.m. and admission is free.

Location: 
Centre for Contemporary Art
350 Sauchiehall Street
Glasgow SCOTLAND, ON
Canada
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Steve McCaffery at Instal Music Festival, Glasgow

Mar 21

Steve McCaffery (Seven Pages Missing) performs his typewriter poem, 'Carnival' (click for excerpt), at The Arches on Saturday, March 21, at 6:40 p.m.

Visit http://www.arika.org.uk/instal/2009/artists/view/7 for more details.

Location: 
The Arches
253 Argyle Street
Glasgow SCOTLAND, ON
Canada
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Readings by Christian Bök and Rachel Zolf reviewed

Recent dispatches from poetry bloggers about San Francisco's Small Press Traffic showcase of the Canadian avant-garde, featuring Christian Bök (Eunoia, Crystallography) and Rachel Zolf (Human Resources), marvel at the 'etymological efflorescence' and 'sheer performativity' of the reading.

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Christian Bök's polarizing poetry

The Stentor (of Lake Forest College, Illinois) interviewed English and Music students after a performance by visiting artist Christian Bök of Eunoia and his sound poetry. It is interesting to see how Bök's work polarized the audience along certain lines, into certain aesthetic camps informed by contrasting values:

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Bookninja posts audio interview with Jordan Scott

Bookninja.com features an audio interview with / reading by Jordan Scott, author of blert, a volume of poetry that explores the stutter.

Listen to it at http://www.bookninja.com/?page_id=4938. And while you're at it, why not download an excerpt from the book?

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Broken Pencil on Jordan Scott's art of stuttering

From Broken Pencil, Issue 41. By Erin Kobayashi.

If Jordan Scott's stutter magically disappeared and he continued to play soccer and rugby, his life could be very different right now. Fortunately, Scott's stutter stuck around. And as luck would have it, he broke his kneecap at 19 and was forced to stay inside for the summer. It was during that recovery period when Scott began to take his first serious stabs at poetry.

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Believing in Blert

By Stephen Burt
The Believer
January 1 2009

Language means things, but no language is only its meanings: any word, said aloud, has a sound, and every phrase is also, in physicists' terms, a set of waves moving through air, produced by tongue, pharynx, larynx, lungs, etc., as they act on the mix of gases we inhale or exhale. Since (at least) the heyday of Gertrude Stein, some poets have tried to focus on speech as physical event, on how brains make tongues create not meanings but sounds. These poets do not just complicate, but nearly sever, links between sound ('t' + 'r' + 'ee') and meaning (what happens when you think of a tree).

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