poetry review

CV2 says the poems in 'Broom Broom' 'simply deserve to be read'

Contemporary Verse 2
June 26 2014

Brecken Hancock is Reviews Editor for Arc Poetry Magazine and Interviews Editor for Canadian Women in the Literary ArtsBroom Broom is her first book of poems and, like Showler, is sure to be one of many. The poems in Broom Broom are not only unlike other Canadian poetry, but they also have a uniqueness from one another. That is not to say that Hancock does not have a strong voice (because she does) but that she has a seemingly endless imagination.

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The Winnipeg Free Press praises Hancock's 'fearless collection'

By Jonathan Ball
Winnipeg Free Press
June 28 2014

In an age of assured debuts, Brecken Hancock's Broom Broom (Coach House, 72 pages, $18) might be the most bold. Reading like a visceral assault on now-clichés of feminist poetry, Hancock's lines tilt domestic stereotypes into nightmare.

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The Bull Calf praises Leigh Kotsilidis' 'gutsy poetic debut'

By Graham Jensen
The Bull Calf
May 20 2014

“In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded,” claims Terry Pratchett in the epigraph to Hypotheticals, Leigh Kotsilidis’s gutsy poetic debut.

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Spacing revvs up with Expressway

Book review: Expressway
By Katherine McLeod
Spacing
August 25 2009

Two new books ... each use systems of mass transit — the subway and the expressway — to investigate the condition of contemporary life. Working both as metaphors and settings for the experiences the poems document, these transit routes become analogies for language — which also brings people from place to place, and from person to person.

[Review of Philip Quinn's The SubWay follows.]

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Hagiography wows Geist

By Leah Rae
Geist Magazine
July 1 2009

What I didn't find in The Echoing Years — some really 'wow' poems — I did find in a much slimmer book, Jen Currin's newest collection, Hagiography. Hagiography (the word literally means the biography of a saint or venerated person) starts with death and ends with life. Currin's verse is mysterious, full-blooded and packed with juicy lines. Here the world is populated with fortune stockings, blood dancers, bruised hats and paper brides.

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Herizons calls Lisa Robertson's Magenta Soul Whip 'completely virtuosic'

Poetry snapshot: Lisa Robertson's Magenta Soul Whip
By Mariianne Mays
Herizons
July 1 2009

Excerpted from the multiple book review:

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Prairie Fire praises Lisa Robertson's Magenta Soul Whip

By John Herbert Cunningham
Prairie Fire
July 3 2009

Lisa Robertson attended the Kootenay School of Writing in Vancouver, which probably accounts for the influence of language writing, particularly that of Lyn Hejinian and Leslie Scalapino, evident in her poetry. Hejinian has written that poetic tension arises as a result of the conflict between the line and the sentence. This is definitely the case with Robertson's writing. Scalapino has taught her to exploit the seams within the tapestry of life.

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U of Arizona Poetry Center applauds Lisa Robertson's Magenta Soul Whip

By
University of Arizona Poetry Center
June 1 2009

Lisa Robertson's Magenta Soul Whip is a cool customer. Many pleasing choices went into the book's design to make it so, from the eponymous title—at once underscoring and holding at arm's length the identity of the poet—to the non-magenta cover, which is chartreuse with a substantial, sanded feel. 'MY FIDELITY IS MY OWN DISASTER' is stamped in silver on the back: what a beginning, or end! The poems inside more than make good on the promise of the design.

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Arc is blessed by Hagiography

Book Review: Hagiography
By Harold Rhenisch
Arc Poetry Magazine
May 15 2009

A hagiography is typically a biography of a saint: Saint Elizabeth, for instance, who was sneaking out with bread to feed the poor; when caught, she said they were roses, and when the cover was torn off her basket, it was full of roses, instead of bread. That kind of miracle. Jen Currin's Hagiography is not about saints. There are no St. Patricks, Christophers, Ursulas or Bonifaces in these pages, neither in a tonsured group staring down from a cathedral ceiling nor even one of them alone with a hair shirt.

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Mansfield Revue hails 'landmark' Crabwise to the Hounds

By Jeff Latosik
Mansfield Revue
May 1 2009

Wallace Stevens famously quipped, 'A poem need not have a meaning and like most things in nature often does not have.' While such a sentiment may do little to win over those who desire a clear raison d'être for their poetry, Stevens' words do contain an elegant implication: a poem is a 'thing in nature' and, as such, is experienced as the world is experienced, with all its attenuating surfeit, mystery, strangeness and contradiction.

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