book review

The Globe & Mail names The Stonehenge Letters as one of the 'best in new small press books'

Looking for a good read? The best in new small press books:

[by JADE COLBERT - special to The Globe and Mail]

The Stonehenge Letters, by Harry Karlinsky, Coach House Books, 264 pages, $17.95

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The Poetry Foundation's Harriet blog is down with DOWN

DESIRE TO BE/IN PROXIMITY/TO OKAYNESS: On Sarah Dowling’s DOWN by Divya Victor

In which Divya talks about reading DOWN & Sarah Dowling talks about making DOWN, and it is absolutely fantastic. You can get down with DOWN too by reading the article here.

The Hamilton Spectator raves about Gods of the Hammer!

By Graham Rockingham
The Hamilton Spectator
March 26 2014

"Once upon a time, Hamilton let some amazing noise loose on the world."
— Author Geoff Pevere from the preface of Gods of the Hammer: The Teenage Head Story.

Any band popular enough to cause a rock 'n' roll riot deserves to have a book written about it.

It has taken almost 35 years, but finally that time has come for Hamilton's Teenage Head. Written by unabashed Head fan Geoff Pevere, and published by Toronto's Coach House Books, Gods of the Hammer: The Teenage Head Story, is scheduled to be in book stores on May 8.

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Wait, you don't like poetry? Shut up, you like poetry.

By Brian McGackin
LitReactor
April 9 2014

Title:

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The Star surrenders to My Winnipeg's dreamscape

By Geoff Pevere
Toronto Star
May 10 2009

My Winnipeg, a book that contains filmmaker Guy (The Saddest Music in the World, Brand Upon the Brain) Maddin's annotated script for his eponymous 2007 Documentary Channel-commissioned movie about his home town, will not get you any closer to an understanding of the city. It will, however, drop you rather precisely in the psychic locale, which is to say his Winnipeg. It's one odd place.

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Broken Pencil commends Chase and Haven

By Spencer Gordon
Broken Pencil
May 1 2009

Chase and Haven is Oxford Mills resident Michael Blouin's first novel, published last fall – exactly a year after the publication of his poetry collection I'm not going to lie to you (Pedlar Press 2007). One can sense the seasoned poet lurking behind the lines of this careful, measured work of fiction.

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The Telegraph-Journal lauds Amphibian

By Sylvie Fitzgerald
Saint John Telegraph-Journal
April 25 2009

Amphibian, the debut novel by Fredericton writer Carla Gunn, is the story of Phineas Walsh, an 'eco-anxious' nine-year-old with an encyclopedic knowledge of animals and nature and a penchant for staring off into space. Phin is a disarming character with the intelligence and vulnerability of Salinger's Holden Caulfield and the clear-thinking non-conformity of Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron.

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Expressway drives the point home for Eye Weekly

By Brian Joseph Davis
Eye Weekly
March 19 2009

(Four out of five stars)

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Stunt enchants The Coast

By Laura Kenins
The Coast
October 16 2008

I've always felt a kinship to Claudia Dey, both of us being right-brained alumni of the same lawyer- and engineer-producing high school. The florid style of her plays and her Globe and Mail advice column has a timeless, nearly ethereal quality. Stunt, her first novel, brings to mind the poetry of Gwendolyn Mac-Ewen (the subject of Dey's play The Gwendolyn Poems) or prose of British author Jeanette Winterson, with its mythological allusions and shape-shifting characters.

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Arthur Reviewer finds westhead's cooked and eaten performance delicious

By Iris Hodgson
Arthur

This article is about dreams come true. Jessica Westhead has written a hilarious novel called Pulpy and Midge, from which she read at last Monday’s Cooked and Eaten reading series. Her book came out just last week from Coach House Books. For Jessica Westhead, that is a dream come true. But here’s the better news: Westhead is a Trent graduate. She has an English degree. She works as a writer and editor. Take heart, fellow English majors! Westhead has become the hero of Trent humanities students.

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