Canadian Architect

Canadian Architect reviews A Progressive Traditionalist

By Gabriel Fain
Canadian Architect
September 15 2009

John M. Lyle was one of the most influential Canadian architects of the first half of the 20th century. Born in Ireland in 1872, Lyle studied at the prestigious École des Beaux Arts in Paris after having immigrated to Hamilton with his family. Following graduation, Lyle worked in several important New York offices before moving to Toronto in 1904 and quickly establishing himself as one of the most prominent architects, educators and activists in the city.

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HTO captivates Canadian Architect

HTO: Toronto's Water from Lake Iroquois to Lost Rivers to Low-flow Toilets, edited by Wayne Reeves and Christina Palassio
By Ian Chodikoff
Canadian Architect
February 1 2009

Despite the manipulation of eco-systems to accommodate our growing cities, the rivers that exist beneath the morass of urbanity can never entirely disappear. This recent publication contains 34 essays to delight the reader, with stories about Toronto's natural systems and man-made infrastructure pertaining to the provision, purification and protection of its water. Reading about watersheds has never been so engaging!

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HTO

Canadian Architect gives The Prix de Rome in Architecture the 'thumbs-up'

By Terrance Galvin
Canadian Architect
April 2007

ROMAN HOLIDAY

A Recent Book Edited by Marco Polo on Prix De Rome Winners From Canada Illustrates That There Remains a High Value Placed on the Tradition of Researching Architectural Ideas While Abroad.

Terrance Galvin

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Canadian Architect reviews Occasional Work

By Julie Bogdanowicz
Canadian Architect
April 2007

Occasional Work and Seven Walks from the Office for Soft Architecture

By Lisa Robertson. Toronto: Coach House Books, 2006.

Lisa Robertson, the Canadian essayist and poet, is not an architect, but her interests in the discipline led her to describe herself as a soft architect.

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