Canadian poetry

The Globe & Mail features Brecken Hancock for National Poetry Month

In honour of National Poetry Month, The Globe & Mail has been featuring poems from this season's "most exciting new collections." Included in these featured poems is Brecken Hancock's "Winter, Frontal Lobe," from her powerful debut collection, Broom Broom.

You can see the poem here.

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White Piano has been nominated for a Best Translated Book Award in Poetry!

Félicitations to Robert Majzels and Erín Moure!

For their beautiful work on Nicole Brossard's poetry collection, White Piano, they have received a nomination for a Best Translated Book Award in Poetry. This award is offered by Three Percent, a destination for readers, editors, and translators interested in finding out about modern and contemporary international literature.

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The Poetry Foundation's Harriet blog is down with DOWN

DESIRE TO BE/IN PROXIMITY/TO OKAYNESS: On Sarah Dowling’s DOWN by Divya Victor

In which Divya talks about reading DOWN & Sarah Dowling talks about making DOWN, and it is absolutely fantastic. You can get down with DOWN too by reading the article here.

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Clockfire one of Jacob McArthur Mooney’s Five Favourite Canadian Poetry Titles of 2010

Toronto poet Jacob McArthur Mooney recently posted a list of his top five Canadian poetry books of the year, and Jonathan Ball's Clockfire is on it.

'VOX describes it as: High-wire conceptual theatrics that inexplicably don’t get old after ten or twenty pages.

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Christian Bök at the Art Bar Poetry Series

Jan 26

Christian Bök, author of Crystallography and the Griffin Prize-winning Eunoia, reads at Toronto's popular and long-running Art Bar reading series.

The Art Bar Poetry Series
featuring Christian Bök and others
Tuesday, January 26, 2010
Clinton's, 693 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON
8 p.m.
Voluntary donations appreciated

Location: 
Clinton's
693 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON
Canada
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Stephen Cain - Canada Dry

Length: 1:37

The closing poem from Stephen Cain's American Standard/Canada Dry.

Stephen Cain - From 'Stop & Go To Slow' (1)

Length: 2:22

Part one of selections from the suite, 'From Stop & Go To Slow,' by Stephen Cain (American Standard/Canada Dry).

Stephen Cain - From 'Stop & Go To Slow' (2)

Length: 1:04

Part two of selections from the suite, 'From Stop & Go To Slow,' by Stephen Cain (American Standard/Canada Dry).

Underground Book Club raves about Sooner

By Michael Bryson
Underground Book Club
July 24 2009

Wordsworth told us poetry was 'spontaneous emotion recollected in tranquility.' Us post-postmoderns now consider this trite in the extreme. About the only thing people seem to agree on these days about poetry is that they don't agree on anything.

When I first encountered Wordsworth's construction as a dim undergraduate, though, it seemed reasonable enough. I hadn't read any Wordsworth. The only poetry I'm sure I'd read before ENG101 was Dennis Lee's Alligator Pie (such was the state of Ontario's school system in the 1980s — which is much improved these days, I’m sure).

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Mansfield Revue hails 'landmark' Crabwise to the Hounds

By Jeff Latosik
Mansfield Revue
May 1 2009

Wallace Stevens famously quipped, 'A poem need not have a meaning and like most things in nature often does not have.' While such a sentiment may do little to win over those who desire a clear raison d'être for their poetry, Stevens' words do contain an elegant implication: a poem is a 'thing in nature' and, as such, is experienced as the world is experienced, with all its attenuating surfeit, mystery, strangeness and contradiction.

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